Bobbi L. Beale, PsyD


bobbi.beale@case.edu  |  330.806.7731  |  Mandel School 375H


bealeBOBBI L. BEALE, PsyD, is a Senior Research Associate, Trainer, and Consultant with the Center for Innovative Practices at the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU)’s Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences.

FOCUS AREAS  |  Dr. Beale has specialized in designing non-traditional therapy programs for youth populations that are at risk or have trauma histories. Her programs have utilized adventure therapy (AT) to increase skills and resiliency, and include individual, family and group applications. She also worked on validating AT with clinical research in Trauma-Informed Day Treatment and implementing a new AT program with both home-based and multi-family group components. Bobbi is also a trainer and consultant on issues related to youth including: Trauma & Resiliency, Bullying, Supportive Behavior Management, Outcomes, Cultural Diversity, Evidence-Based Practices and Teambuilding.

EXPERIENCE  |  Dr. Beale previously served as the Director of the Center for Applied Resilience at Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health in Canton, Ohio. She has been serving at-risk youth and families at C&A since 1991; first as a home-based therapist, then a program supervisor, program designer and division director.

SCHOLARSHIP  |  Click here for a complete listing of this researcher’s work.


Q: Why is your work at the Begun Center important to you, to our community, and to the world?

We help behavioral health agencies and providers to stay up to date on effective and innovative practices for children, youth and families.

Q: What is a cause about which you are particularly passionate?

Children and youth that experience trauma act out in ways that appear to be intentionally inappropriate, often impulsive, aggressive and/or self-centered. Traditionally adults have punished these behaviors in an effort to reduce or eliminate the unwanted behaviors. Unfortunately, punishments and threats are not only ineffective, but actually increase the trauma response. We need to stop punishing survival responses and increasing our relational interventions.


Examining the Concurrent Validity of the Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children
Research on Social Work Practice; November 2016.

The Use of Adventure Therapy in Community-Based Mental Health: Decreases in Problem Severity Among Youth Clients
Child & Youth Care Forum Journal of Research and Practice in Children’s Services; April 2013.